CHARLOTTE—Members and advocates of the LGBT community are responding to a city ordinance proposal that would amend Charlotte’s non-discrimination policy. The proposal calls for a non-discrimination clause for city contractors and contract bids. 

Proponents of changes to Charlotte’s non-discrimination ordinance say it’s needed to protect commercial businesses and city workers. Paige Dula who identifies astransgender is hopeful everyone will see beyond the bathroom issue.

The proposed change would allow transsexual or transitioning persons to use the restroom in the gender with which they identify. Proponents of changes to Charlotte’s non-discrimination ordinance say it’s needed to protect commercial businesses and city workers.

Paige Dula who identifies as transgender is hopeful everyone will see beyond the bathroom issue. The proposed change would allow transsexual or transitioning persons to use the restroom in the gender with which they identify.

"All you can go on is how a person presents. I present myself as female and really it's nobody else's business,” said Dula.

Some members of city council questioned how gender identity could impact children.

"I am not comfortable taking my 6 year old daughter into the men's room, nor is it acceptable for me to go into the women's room. And I think I should have full faith and confidence as I send my daughter into the restroom, who's in that restroom,” said Kenny Smith, the District 6 representative.

Smith asked that people who share those beliefs not be put in a box.

Dula says she hasn’t been discriminated against in Charlotte. But, it has happened elsewhere.

"At a restaurant and there were men waiting for me outside the women's restroom. And it was just by fortune and the fact that I could run faster that I wasn't assaulted that night,” said Dula.

It is that fear for safety that Dula believes would disappear with change. The changes to city contract work and vehicles for hire add working that includes sexual orientation, gender identity, and general expression. It is wording that city council members agree is needed.

The key to the discussion could ultimately be including the community.

"We need to do this in step with where society is or at least with some acknowledgment,” said Ed Driggs, the Representative for District 7.

City council will ask for public input before voting on the proposal on Feb. 23.